development

  • {Less} is more?

    {Less} - I recently read an interesting (and well-reasoned) summary of the workflow for building themes by Pierre-Alain Leboucher on the Prestashop blog that had a reference to {less}. I don't mind admitting that I love reading about new technologies and techniques, and predictably a google search later and I was browsing various sites, and getting more and more hooked on the concept by the minute.

  • 1.4 Plugins Revisited - Part 2

    Extending Prestashop Theme Plugins - In this article we look at a mechanism to allow theme developers to include their own smarty plugins seamlessly into their themes, with the code contained within the theme distribution itself.

  • 1.4 Plugins Revisited - Part 1

    Plugins Evolved A while ago when I wrote the original article on Prestashop plugins I promised a follow-up to allow it to be used with smarty 3. Unfortunately work has kept me from a proper write-up so I'm only now getting around to publishing the next version. I had intended adding the ability to easily extend the functionality on a per-theme basis, but since the demand for some usable code right now has been so great I've decided to publish this in two parts.

  • Latest Theme and Module Development Tools News - March 2011

    Since Prestashop 1.4 has now gone into production,  the original Smarty debug module has been updated to support the latest features. Specifically this means that you should be able to debug both Smarty v2 and Smarty v3 Pretashop themes using the tool. You can read more about it and download the module from the [Debugging Prestashop Templates](/news/the-ultimate-prestashop-module-and-theme-development-tool/) page.

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  • Tired of hooks? Try a Plugin (Prestashop 1.4)

    **Update:** This article has been revised in: [1.4 Plugins Revisited](/prestashop-articles/1-4-plugins-revisited-part-1/)

  • The Ultimate Prestashop Module and Theme Development Tool

    Debugging Prestashop Templates - While stumbling around the internet as you do when pondering a particularly awkward programming challenge, I came across an excellent post on smarty debug with FireBug. This inspired me to pull together a Prestashop module to allow store owners, designers and developers to view indepth debugging data from right within the Prestashop environment.

  • Display module output anywhere

    I came across a post on the Prestshop forum recently that was discussing how to display the contents of a single module on a page. The example proposed worked, but it seems to me that it worked only through sheer luck rather than design as all that was being done was to display a smarty .tpl file. The smarty variables required for the module used in the example were all included as global values, so it worked, but most other modules would need to be able to execute their underlying hook code in order to display anything meaningful.

  • Resetting your Prestashop

    I'm not a great fan of commercial software, but there are some tools that are probably worth paying for -- otherwise the author wouldn't be able to maintain the code. I know from personal experience that relying on donations doesn't pay the bills.

  • Using FirePHP (FireBug) with Prestashop

    Debugging can be such a pain sometimes... I've been using FirePHP for some time now on my CodeIgniter projects and recently while I was looking at doing some cool things with the product data returned by the Category::getProducts() function it struck me that it would be nice to be able to easily see exactly what data was returned.

  • Storing complex configuration data

    While porting the WP-Cumulus plugin to Prestashop I came across an interesting situation. In the original plugin the parameters for the Flash movie are stored in an array that is obtained from the Wordpress database using a get_option() call. In Prestashop the parameters can be retrieved in bulk using Configuration::getMultiple(), but in that case you have to specify the key names for all the parameters which is a pain.

  • Writing your own Prestashop Module – Part 5

    In this part of our basic module writing tutorial series we'll look at the final steps to transform our Tutorialthird module class into a base template that we can use to kick start the writing of new modules. Rather than republish the same old code again we'll only discuss the changes, but I've added a download link at the end of this part so you can grab the final code and use it as the basis for your own projects. We're going to call this module "Skeleton" - a name that we'll replace with our own when it comes to producing new modules based on it.

  • Writing your own Prestashop Module - Part 4

    Form Validation and Security - In this tutorial we will look at the general issue of form input checking and security, both for Back Office and Front Office forms and user input as well as looking at improving our code both functionally and aesthetically.

  • Paypal WPP (Example) - PayPal Direct API

    Development Release - I've been asked several times about this, so I guess I'd better release the code. This was written some time ago, and the target PrestaShop version was 1.1, however it should work with later releases.

  • Writing your own Prestashop Module - Part 3

    Storing Module Configuration - In the third part of this series we'll look at how we can store configuration data for our modules in the Prestashop database, and how we can allow users to interact with this data to control the module's behaviour. We will also briefly touch on how we can generate output from our module to provide visual feedback of the configuration changes.

  • Writing your own Prestashop Module - Part 2

    Creating a basic module - In this second part of the series we will look at creating our first basic Prestashop module that can be controlled from the Back Office.

  • Writing your own PrestaShop Module - Part 1

    So you want to write a module? - There has always been a little bit of Voodoo associated Prestashop modules. This has been mainly down to a lack of documentation available, but never fear -- this series of tutorials aim to introduce module writing to the PHP programming masses.